examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

User avatar
ott
Posts: 218
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by ott »

'enter' is IN.TRÉDA, 'penetrate' is BINNA.TRÉDA

In a 2018 blog post, I argued that the origin from 'enter' is much better explained through Dutch: 'in-treden', German: 'ein-treten', English: 'tread-in', Norse: 'tre-inn' (etc.), or in its purest form (Fryas) IN.TRÉDA.

Recently, I realised that also 'penetrate' can much better be explained by Fryas BINNA.TRÉDA (Dutch: 'binnentreden') than by Latin 'penetrare' (said to be derived from 'penitus': 'internally', 'inwardly'). This compound verb is used in the creation myth (ch. 2b, [006/29]):

WR.ALDA.S OD TRÀD TO RA BINNA

Currently translated as "They received Wralda’s ‘od’ into them" (I may change this, making Wralda's od subject, as in the original Fryas.)

Image
Wil Helm
Posts: 40
Joined: 24 Feb 2023, 18:18

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by Wil Helm »

This is gold! :-)

PENETRATE = BINNETREED
ENTER = IN-TREE

Latin myth unmasked.
User avatar
ott
Posts: 218
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by ott »

In another thread, Fryas KJASAR (chooser) was mentioned as the possible origin of caesar (German: Kaiser) and HÁGEST/HÁCHST (highest) of August.

Many more examples could be given, like Basileus from BÁS (master, ruler) and LJUD.HIS (of the people), as explained in 2014 blog post.
User avatar
Nordic
Posts: 147
Joined: 31 Dec 2022, 11:08

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by Nordic »

Excellent. More of this please, Ott!

And what is the Bas 'master, ruler'? Could it be from paasi 'stone' (see here), as in the story of häll Hel-stone that ended up all the way to Hindu tales of Nordic Uttarakuru land (attested here) and the Germanic tradition of choosing kings by standing on stones? The "boss" stone seen here:
For men of consequence a mound should be raised to their memory, and for all other warriors who had been distinguished for manhood a standing stone; which custom remained long after Odin's time. (Source: Ynglinga saga, ch. 8)

The Stones of Mora (Swedish: Mora stenar) is a historic location in Knivsta, Sweden. Several Medieval kings of Sweden were proclaimed at the assembly of Mora near modern Uppsala. [...] The Stones of Mora were originally named in singular as Mora sten referring to a stone on which the newly elected king stood after his election.(Wikipedia on Stones of Mora)
Here is an illustration of one paasi king being elected:
Mora-stone-election.jpg
Mora-stone-election.jpg (192.59 KiB) Viewed 821 times
User avatar
ott
Posts: 218
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by ott »

ott wrote: 16 May 2024, 11:33LJUD.HIS (of the people)
I should add that some cognates of LJUD are:
German - Leute
Dutch - lui, lieden
Norse - lyd
Fins - liuta
Old English - lēod(e)
Middle Engish - lede
Old Norse - lýðr, ljóðr
Nordic wrote: 17 May 2024, 01:25The "boss" stone
Interesting, thanks!
User avatar
Kraftr
Posts: 151
Joined: 10 Apr 2023, 07:57

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by Kraftr »

there is a Goth connection to the sanskrit word Jens(generation), linked to Latin genus(Latin, with many words from that official root) and kin in english.
In language the suffix -jen -gen -ken, is supposed to stem from it as a causal, generative relation.
This brings me to GEFN/ GEFJON, a name of Frya, so 'giving' or 'cause of abundance'
(putting three names together reads like a sentence; FRYA BERTHE GEFJON= generating freeborn?)
Interesting are the statues where Berthe has one goosefoot, moeder de gans, and the goose as symbol.
User avatar
Pax
Posts: 115
Joined: 31 Dec 2022, 13:58

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by Pax »

Good point, Kraft. Note that Sanskrit would be influenced by the Fryas-speaking Geartmen in southeastern Iran, maybe in the ancient region of Carmania, just as Latin was influenced by an uncertain Frya source: neolithic Fryas in Greece (before 2193 BC), descendants of Nef-Tunis (~2092 BC), descendants of Minerva (~1630 BC), migrating Goths from the north (1630-1200s BC?) or neolithic Fryas in Italy (~1280 BC, after the Trojan War). Both Sanskrit and Latin have dramatic sound changes caused by foreigners adopting Frya vocabulary.

Ernst Jäkel gives in Der germanische Urspung der lateinischen Sprache examples of many old Germanic words which are the ancestors of Latin words. One could connect those Germanic words to their Frya ancestors. It is a gold mine of linguistic research waiting to be excavated. Random examples from p. 36-41 with my own notes added:
  • Fryas *GOD.MAN/MÀN “good man/person” → Old Saxon gumo/guma, Old High German gomo → Latin homō (homin-), hūmānus (hūmān-). Saying god Mand and good man is still common in Danish and English. The “gomo” still survives in words like Danish Brudgom, English bridegoom.
  • Fryas FÁMNA “maidens” → Old English fæmne → Latin fēmina
  • Fryas *MAN.S → -n- discarded by sound change, creating Latin mās, masculīnus, like gigās from gigant, or elephās/elephāns from elephant.
  • Fryas TONGE/TVNGE → Old Saxon tunga, Old High German zunga → Old Latin dingua → Latin lingua
  • Fryas MVND?, so far translated as “mouth” in ch. 16g → Old Saxon mund, Old High German munt, Old English mund “hand, palm, protection” → Latin manus (manut-). The word survives in Danish Myndighed “authority” and Formynder “guardian”.
A few dictionaries for cross-checking:
Vigtig Viden eller ligegyldig Info?
User avatar
ott
Posts: 218
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by ott »

Kraftr wrote: 17 May 2024, 18:04... the sanskrit word Jens (generation), linked to Latin genus (...) and kin in english
This reminds me of KNY and KIND- in OL.
A relation to English kin, and Latin genus (→ genetics, genealogy, gender) seems obvious.
Possibly also KÀNNA (kennen, know) and KÀNING/KÉNING (king).
Compare Middle Dutch Cnie.
This deserves more elaboration, but time for it is lacking me.
Blog post 2020: KNI, KNÍ, KNY - knee, 'degree of kinship'
User avatar
Kraftr
Posts: 151
Joined: 10 Apr 2023, 07:57

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by Kraftr »

I think that gen was used in the north conform its purest meaning; as an action, a description of causality, therefor making the words into verbs, whereas in latin it got more used as a noun, leading to it's own huge set of combinationwords.
Kening seems to fit, as a sort of ''father', cnie makes me think of 'evenknie'

source -jan suffix as causative
https://youtu.be/_HPZxFZXWn0?t=2142

some Gothic words from this video that interested me (sorry, not on topic toward Latin);
wiljan -to want ;wil-generating. Willbett in mind, I believe WIL would then be something like engagement, determination, ordering.
warjan -to forbid, wehren; war=taboo, untouchable, protection? again; Warbett? and 'warhed', should be interpreted like similar to 'ironclad''
ananiujan -to make new; aan-nieuw(g)en, thinking of Anbett
frathjan -to understand; to make frath(frater-brother?)
lagjan -to lay; to make low(laag)
hreinjen -to make clean; reinigen rein-i-gen

but on topic to Latin;
hw-words (qu-words in latin)
https://youtu.be/_HPZxFZXWn0?t=2336
User avatar
ott
Posts: 218
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

Re: examples of Fryas words being more pure than Latin or Greek

Post by ott »

WÉRHÉD → veritas
ÉNHÉD → unitas
WÁNHÉD → vanitas
weerwiel.jpg
weerwiel.jpg (81.21 KiB) Viewed 722 times
Waanheid.jpg
Waanheid.jpg (190.28 KiB) Viewed 722 times
Post Reply