Friars & Friar Tuck

both within OL texts as in relation to other traditions
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tatehiebert
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Joined: 18 Mar 2024, 05:51

Friars & Friar Tuck

Post by tatehiebert »

Has anyone looked into this being possibly related to Freyja, Fryans and the Frisians?

A very qualified shamanic type person I know referenced the Friars, Friar Tuck and the Fryas as related to Freyja… it makes sense in terms of the words being related so it would probably make sense that it would be connected!!!
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Helgiteut
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Joined: 31 Dec 2022, 13:48
Location: Melbourne, VIC

Re: Friars & Friar Tuck

Post by Helgiteut »

Hello. The official etymology for "friar" is that it comes from the Latin word for a brother. It seems to be right, as monks are called brother in english, the same way a priest is called father.

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https://www.oxfordreference.com/display/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095835586
Brea, bûter en griene tsiis is goed Ingelsk en goed Frysk
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Pax
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Joined: 31 Dec 2022, 13:58

Re: Friars & Friar Tuck

Post by Pax »

Concur with Helgiteut. Fryas BROTHER was borrowed into Latin as frāter through the sound changes b → f, o → ā, th → t. frāter did not originate from the theoretical, non-existent “Proto-Indo-European” language. Fryas BROTHER might have had an unattested *BRÔTHER, hence the long vowel in Old Saxon brōthar and long vowel in Latin frāter. The Latin frāter was then borrowed into French as frère, and from French to English as friar. Keep in mind that modern “English” is confusing mutt mix of French, Latin, Greek and some remnants of its past Anglo-Saxon identity. This creates a lot of false friends where some words which sound or look alike are not necessarily related to each other.
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