Corrections 'Codex Oera Linda'

Post Reply
User avatar
ott
Posts: 224
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

Corrections 'Codex Oera Linda'

Post by ott »

In appendix II of the second (p.244), third and fourth edition (both p.153), a mistake was made. The underlined part of the following statement is incorrect (wording of fourth edition):
In an 1863 publication about Germanic words for ‘woman’,* Verwijs suggested that the name of the town Vronen was derived from the Old Frisian word FRÁN (Dutch: vroom; sacred, pious), while the form FOR.ÁNA (Dutch: voor-aan; in front) was used in Codex Oera Linda. [*Title: ‘De namen der vrouw bij den Germaan’, 1863.]
It should be (see p. 14 of Verwijs' publication):
(...) that the name of the town Vronen was derived from ‘vroon’ meaning ‘lord/master’ (Dutch ‘heer’), while (...)
This does not change the argument made, i.e. that Verwijs' interpretation of the name Vronen/Vroonen was different from what is suggested in Oera Linda.
User avatar
ott
Posts: 224
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Corrections 'Codex Oera Linda'

Post by ott »

Chapter 13i. Apollania’s Journey

Changes underlined (was: 'Alderga' / 'an hour'):
[110/17] Finally, we arrived at the Aldergamouth*. At the southern head of the harbor stands the Treasureburg, a stone building where a variety of shells, horns, weapons, and clothes are kept, brought home from distant lands by the steersmen. A quarter of a day from there is the Alderga,* a great lake surrounded by barns, houses, and gardens — all richly ornamented.

notes:
*1. The original says 'Alderga', but from the context it is clear that this must be 'Aldergamouth'.
*2. ‘quarter of a day’ (FJARDÉL) — lit.: ‘four-deal’. Uncertain.
User avatar
ott
Posts: 224
Joined: 08 Dec 2022, 16:16
Location: Drenthe, Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Corrections 'Codex Oera Linda'

Post by ott »

The "Medea may laugh" fragment of chapter 11c has never been translated well. Until now it was a mystery what was funny about the remark by the quipster from Staveren.
MÉDÉA MÉI LAKKJA SA WI HÍR UT HJRA BURCH REDA
Ottema interpreted HÍR as 'her' and this was copied by all later Dutch translators. Sandbach had: "Medea may well laugh if we rescue her from her citadel."

Menckens (German, 2013) was right to translate HÍR as 'here', buit still missed the point: "Mêdêa mag lachen, daß wir (von) hier aus ihre Burg retten."

With the help of lead editor Bruce Stafford, the new translation is:
As the steersmen lay waiting in the creek [before defeating the enemy], a quipster from Staveren was among them, who said: “Medea may laugh, if us hiding in a creek can save her burg!” Thus, the maidens named the creek ‘Medea-mei-lakkia’.
With footnote:
HÍR UT — can have a double meaning: "from out of here" or "out of this (plan)".
Post Reply