Kamperland SÉKÀMPAR?

Identifying meaning and location. Aiming to create maps and a list.
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Bjorn_Steinthorsson
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Joined: 18 Sep 2023, 13:33

Kamperland SÉKÀMPAR?

Post by Bjorn_Steinthorsson »

https://wiki.oeralinda.org/view/048
HÉMAR FONA DÉNEMARKA ALONT THÉRE SANDFAL. NW SKELDA. WRDON STJURAR. SÉKÀMPAR ÀND ANGELARA HÉTON
In the province of Zeeland there is a place called Kamperland. It's on the island of Noord-Beveland between the island Walcheren and the Oosterschelde.
Wikipedia tells the following:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamperland
The village was first mentioned in 976 as Campan, and means "land of Kampen", a former village which used to be located in the area, and was lost in the flood of 1530. Kamperland is a road village which developed in the second half of the 18th century after the Heer Janszpolder was diked in 1699
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Helgiteut
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Location: Melbourne, VIC

Re: Kamperland SÉKÀMPAR?

Post by Helgiteut »

Hello Bjorn. The name Kampen means fighter, related to Anglo-French "Champion" https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/champion. So it might not be marking where the Seakampers themselves where, but some other fighters. I'll leave a link to the Sicambri, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sicambri, in case you haven't heard about them before. The river "Sieg" could have been named after them, although I don't know if "sea warriors" would have been that far down the Rhine.
Brea, bûter en griene tsiis is goed Ingelsk en goed Frysk
Bjorn_Steinthorsson
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Joined: 18 Sep 2023, 13:33

Re: Kamperland SÉKÀMPAR?

Post by Bjorn_Steinthorsson »

Indeed, but given the location there's a possibility.
I looked into the etymology of the name and in relation to the region name they suggest it probably means "field" or "marked field" from the Roman campus. But in the dictionary results lists military camps and related as possibilities as well.

So who knows :)
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Nordic
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Re: Kamperland SÉKÀMPAR?

Post by Nordic »

Thanks for the finding, was not aware of it earlier. This is somewhat similar to how Paul the Deacon lists early Germanic names in his History of the Langobards (Lombards in Italy):
the abandonment of their native soil and the search for foreign fields, after two [Winnili] leaders had been appointed over them, to wit: Ibor and Aio[*], who were brothers [...] The mother of these leaders, Gambara by name,2 was a woman of the keenest ability and most prudent in counsel among her people, and they trusted not a little to her shrewdness in doubtful matters.

2 The word gambar, according to Grimm (Deutsche Mythologie, I, 336), is the equivalent of strenuus [Latin 'brisk, nimble, quick, prompt, active']

[...] the men of old tell a silly story that the Wandals coming to Godan (Wotan [Odin, Wodin]) besought him for victory over the Winnili and that the answered that would give the victory to those whome he saw first at sunrise [story pun on Oden/Utu as sun deity]; that then Gambara went to Frea (Freja [Freyja, Frya, Frigg]) wife of Godan and asked for victory for the Winnili, and that Frea gave her counsel that the women of the Winnili should take down their hair and arrange it upont the face like a beard ['long-beard' Lombard story follows on from here] (source: Paul the Deacon, History of the Langobards)
I think the gambar/strenuus descibes quite well a 'fighter' (kampar, German noun Kampf, Finnish verb kamppailla) and we have the Wodin and Frya connection in the story as well (Winnili may perhaps be some mixed heritage Scandinavian Finns of OL, Norse sagas and Jordanes' Getica).

* Perhaps Bórri or Búri and Äijä (Old Norse form Ái in Rígsþula); cf. listed variant version Iborea/Ebbo/Ebbe and Agio/Aggo/Aaghe to names Hyperborea and Ægir.
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