Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done etc.

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Helena
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Joined: 05 Jan 2023, 22:00

Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done etc.

Post by Helena »

A few questions/loose ideas (maybe too farfetched):

Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done, when and where? Has the tapestry with images anything to do with it (such as this https://www.bayeuxmuseum.com/en/the-bayeux-tapestry/)?

Could the reason of the fires in churches be the destruction of the tex etc. on tapestries (these are flammable and the statues are not)?
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Helgiteut
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Location: Melbourne, VIC

Re: Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done etc.

Post by Helgiteut »

Helena wrote: 13 Mar 2023, 19:17 A few questions/loose ideas (maybe too farfetched):

Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done, when and where? Has the tapestry with images anything to do with it (such as this https://www.bayeuxmuseum.com/en/the-bayeux-tapestry/)?

Could the reason of the fires in churches be the destruction of the tex etc. on tapestries (these are flammable and the statues are not)?
This is from OLB 064/page 97 in Ott's translation:
SVNUM ÀND TOGHATRUM FRYA.S. I WÉT WEL THÀT WI INNA LERSTE TÍD FÜL LEK AND BREK LÉDEN
HÀVE. THRVCHDAM THA STJÛRAR NAVT LÔNGER KVME VMB.VS SKRIF.FILT [15] TO VRSELLA. MEN J
NÉTE NAVT HWÉRTHRVCH ET KVMEN IS.
‘Sons and daughters of Frya! As you well know, we have recently suffered much loss and misery since the steersmen no longer come to export our writing felt. You do not know, however, how that came about.
LÔNG HÀV IK MY THÉR VR INHALDEN THACH NV KÀN.K.ET NAVT LÔNGER ÔN. HARK THEN FRJUNDA
TILTHJU I WÉTA MÜGE HWÉRNÉI J BITA MÉI. ANDA [20] ÔRA SYDE THÉRE SKELDA HWÉR HJA TOMET
THA FÉRT FON ALLE SÉA HÀVE THÉR MÁKATH HJA HJVD.DÉGON SKRIF.FILT FON POMPA.BLÉDAR
For a long time I have controlled myself, but I cannot bear it any longer. Hear, my
friends, that you may know where to bite. On the other side of the Scheldt, where
ships from almost all seas pass by, they currently make writing felt from waterlily
leaves.
Writing felt is mentioned here, though that might be only for books. The word "WRITEN" is used for what was on the burg walls, while the word "SKRIWA" was used for what was on the paper. It seems funny that is English "writing" is done on paper, and "inscribing" is done on stone. So Ott has to translate WRITEN as "inscribe", and he has to translate SCRIWA as "write". Anyway, the chronology is thought to be around 1630 b.c.
Brea, bûter en griene tsiis is goed Ingelsk en goed Frysk
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Nordic
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Re: Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done etc.

Post by Nordic »

It's possible that there existed such textiles on Frisian house walls. Now they may have also hung on the walls shields with texts in them:
Widows and orphans of war must also be cared for, and the sons may write the names of their
fathers on their shields for the honor of their families. (Source: OL 025-026)
Several Germanic shield finds exists, but to my knowledge the surviving examples do not retain any writing (not sure if metallic shields is implied above). We know that the Germanic peoples made tapestries with similar imaginery to metal finds with texts in them, so it's definitely possible.
emma999
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Joined: 02 Jul 2023, 02:03

Re: Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done etc.

Post by emma999 »

Helena wrote: 13 Mar 2023, 19:17 A few questions/loose ideas (maybe too farfetched):

Was the tex written on textile and if so, in what timeframe was this done, when and where? Has the tapestry with images anything to do with it (such as this https://www.bayeuxmuseum.com/en/the-bayeux-tapestry/)?

I recall a time when I wore my poncho to the church, and someone inquired about where I had purchased it. I told him the website and some other designs are available here.

Could the reason of the fires in churches be the destruction of the tex etc. on tapestries (these are flammable and the statues are not)?
Thanks for sharing your questions and ideas. It's always fascinating to explore historical connections and theories. Regarding your first question about whether the text was written on textile, there have been instances in history where text was indeed written on textiles. One notable example is the Bayeux Tapestry you mentioned, which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century. The text on the Bayeux Tapestry is embroidered onto the textile itself, providing additional context to the images.

As for the timeframe and location of such practices, the specific use of text on textiles can vary across cultures and time periods. Embroidered texts on textiles have been found in different parts of the world throughout history, serving purposes ranging from storytelling to religious or ceremonial significance.

Regarding your second question about the fires in churches, it's important to note that each incident needs to be examined individually. While some fires in churches may be caused by flammable elements such as tapestries, it's crucial to consider multiple factors like electrical faults, arson, or accidental causes. Tapestries can be flammable, but their presence alone may not necessarily be the primary reason for church fires. Fire prevention measures, including fire-retardant treatments for textiles and proper safety protocols, are typically in place to mitigate such risks.

Exploring connections and theories like these can be thought-provoking, and it's great to see your curiosity at work. If you have any more questions or thoughts, feel free to share. Let's keep the friendly discussion going!
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